The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime review Ñ 103

summary The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime

The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime review Ñ 103 í In this fascinating exploration of murder in nineteenth century England Judith Flanders examines some of the most gripping cases that captivated the VictIn this fascinating exploration of murder in nineteenth century England Judith Flanders examines some of the most gripping cases that captivated the Victorians and gave rise to the first detective fictionMurder in the nineteenth century was rare But murder as sensation and entertainment became ubiuitous with cold blooded killings transformed into novels broadsides ballads opera and melodrama even into puppet shows and performing dog acts Detective fiction and the new police force developed in parall. This was a impulsive Audible download when it first came out and I've been doggedly listening to it in the mornings getting ready for work Doggedly gives you a clue as it how I feel about it There were times when I was incredibly close to defeat Not because the subject isn't interesting but because the telling was very formulaic First there is the outline plot of a seminal murder followed by a discussion of how it impacted in popular media and culture uite often the latter becomes a monotonous list of plays broadsides stories Very good for illustrating a point in a PhD thesis perhaps but difficult to get exercised about as a lay reader The repetition was probably exacerbated by the way I read the book in short 20 minute chunks I also felt the core narrative or argument got lost amidst all case studies In the end I was only slogging my way on until Jack the Ripper knowing it would herald the end The thing that kept me going was the excellent narrator

Judith Flanders Ç 3 download

El each imitating the other the founders of Scotland Yard gave rise to Dickens's Inspector Bucket the first fictional police detective who in turn influenced Sherlock Holmes and ultimately even PD James and Patricia CornwellIn this meticulously researched and engrossing book Judith Flanders retells the gruesome stories of many different types of murder both famous and obscure from Greenacre who transported his dismembered fiancée around town by omnibus to Burke and Hare’s bodysnatching business. Although the title suggests otherwise the Victorians did not invent murder They were merely the first to make it profitableAs the eighteenth century morphed into the nineteenth public discussion of homicide in Great Britain shifted from the pulpits to the press inspiring stage dramas and best selling ‘penny dreadfuls’ No one was immune to the allure the nobility attended murder trials as faithfully as the working classes executions were witnessed by stadium sized crowds and literary giants such as Charles Dickens and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle let bloodshed inspire and infuse their stories The Examiner had a dedicated column titled “Murders and Murderous Crimes” which probably did wonders for its circulation The Invention of Murder explains how violent death affected popular culture Literature wise detective stories and ‘sensation novels’ were born and the stage hosted blood and thunder melodramas Racehorses and greyhounds were named after killers and their victims Some slayings captured the public interest so strongly that the key players achieved icon status the curious and the entrepreneurial eagerly bought items that once belonged to or were associated with an executed killer and crime scenes turned into sightseeing destinations You could even buy china figurines of famous murderers and their victims as was the case with William Corder and Maria Marten of Red Barn fameNot all of the crimes described and analyzed in this volume are famous The Ripper murders Burke and Hare and Constance Kent are familiar to modern readers but Eugene Aram Eliza Fenning and John Thurtell are not That doesn’t make their stories less fascinating to revisit especially since they inspired advancements in the police services and forensic scienceJudith Flanders has an innate understanding of what makes a society tick and uses that insight to explain why some murderers like Eugene Aram claimed only one victim but spawned a legacy of creative works while serial killers like Christiana Edmunds were forgotten soon after their trials concluded These analyses give The Invention of Murder an essay like tone in parts which may perturb some readers who prefer content to be limited to the crimes themselves It may not be light reading but it’s definitely enlightening

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The Invention of Murder How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern CrimeIn Edinburgh; from the crimes and myths of Sweeney Todd and Jack the Ripper to the tragedy of the murdered Marr family in London’s East EndThrough these stories of murder from the brutal to the pathetic Flanders builds a rich and multi faceted portrait of Victorian society in Great Britain  With an irresistible cast of swindlers forgers and poisoners the mad the bad and the utterly dangerous The Invention of Murder is both a mesmerizing tale of crime and punishment and history at its most readab. Very dry I tried to read the first 30 pages and got bored I tried to skim the next 50 pages and got even bored I was excited to read this book but it was big let down Other books that are similar but better are The Beautiful Cigar Girl by Daniel Stashower and The Suspicions of Mr Which by Kate Summerscale