The Age of Innocence characters æ 7


review The Age of Innocence

The Age of Innocence characters æ 7 ↠ Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s masterful portrait of desire and betrayal during the sumptuous Golden Age of Old New York a time when society people “dreaded scandal than disease”This is Newland Archer’s world as he prepares to marry the beautiful but convenEaded scandal than disease”This is Newland Archer’s world as he prepares to marry the beautiful but conventional May Welland But when the mysterious Countess Ellen Olenska returns to New York af. The most perfect ending in literature I'll never get over it

The Age of InnocenceEaded scandal than disease”This is Newland Archer’s world as he prepares to marry the beautiful but conventional May Welland But when the mysterious Countess Ellen Olenska returns to New York af. The most perfect ending in literature I'll never get over it

Read & Download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ü Edith Wharton

The Age of Innocence ☆ Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s masterful portrait of desire and betrayal during the sumptuous Golden Age of Old New York a time when society people “dr. ‘The longing was with him day and night an incessant undefinable craving like the sudden whim of a sick man for food or drink once tasted and long since forgotten He could not see beyond the craving or picture what it might lead to for he was not conscious of any wish to speak to Madame Olenska or to hear her voice He simply felt that if he could carry away the vision of the spot of earth she walked on and the way the sky and sea enclosed it the rest of the world might seem less empty’ There was never getting away from their circumstances for Newland and Ellen the protagonists of The Age of Innocence As I weep for them and their unreuited love I realized it was not meant to be Edith Wharton depicts masterfully New York’s traditions and judgmental airs which were from the start against them This elite group within which they existed had very rigid rules of behavior social rituals fashion and clear censures for those that violated them There is a clear hypocrisy in their life that existed behind their conservative moral exterior In reality they all lived in a kind of hieroglyphic world where the real thing was never said or done or even thought but only represented by a set of arbitrary signs As I started reading Edith Wharton’s crisp prose and witty dialogues I got to know Newland Archer May Welland and Ellen Countess Olenska What was inescapable from the outset is that they were a product of New York society of their timeAs Newland meets Countess Olenska he is not prepared for her worldly persona Thus it is that May and Newland make their engagement public right away to ease the acceptance of Ellen into their social pack May is considered the perfect model of what a young wife should be young beautiful soft obedient pliant conventional and with no opinions on anything of importance We would consider her boring but those were different times Newland starts out pretty much the same; he's a young lawyer used to his luxurious and idle style of living; all in accord with the strict rules of society Yes both are good persons with many amiable ualities but they simply are not exceptional They were clearly not in love just following rituals that defined that a young man should marry a nice girl with a good family ’There was no better match in New York than May Welland look at the uestion from what point you choose Of course such a marriage was only what Newland was entitled to’Newland and Ellen’s love story is nevertheless magnificent because it is the changes and character growth of both lovers that make it endearing and wonderful When we first meet Newland Archer he could not have been in tune with New York society’s status uo But Newland Archer was too imaginative not to feel that in his case and May's the tie might gall for reasons far less gross and palpable What could he and she really know of each other since it was his duty as a decent fellow to conceal his past from her and hers as a marriageable girl to have no past to conceal If Newland Archer seems indecisive and hesitant it's in part because he is conflicted with his values and desires He even starts defending new ideas ”Women ought to be free – as free as we are” Nevertheless it is easy to note how typical Newland Archer was when we first meet him how judgmental how hypocritical There was nothing mean or ungenerous in the young man’s heart and he was glad that his future wife should be restrained by false prudery from being kind in private to her unhappy cousin; but to receive Countess Olenska in the family circle was a different thing from producing her in public at the Opera of all places and in the very box with the young girl whose engagement to him Newland Archer was to be announced in a few weeks No he felt as old Sillerton Jackson felt; he did not think the Mingotts would have tried it on Could he h Read & Download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ü Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton Ü 7 review

Edith Wharton Ü 7 review Ter a disastrous marriage Archer falls deeply in love with her Torn between duty and passion Archer struggles to make a decision that will either courageously define his life or mercilessly destroy. Myself and the Pulitzer prize have previously not always seen eye to eye but Finally I have read one worthy of giving top marks to This golden oldie captures the wholesome atmosphere of American life and the highest standard of American manners and manhood from a bygone era where modern ideas are resisted and tradition overcomes compassion The inhabitants of this hothouse of New York society is built on wealth life is lavished easy and comfortably cushioned but this world may just as well have been covered in a blanket of cobwebs as the lives are so sedate and uneventfully dull despite their opulent surroundings they appear colourless and motionless It is ultimately a tragic tale that Wharton weaves and yes as with a lot of classic fiction based around love it's told with air of melancholy because this love is one that doesn't really get off the ground For Newland Archer the leading male character there is an imagining of an alternative existence to the one that convention has pressed upon him he has built within himself a kind of sanctuary for his secret thoughts and longings Within these walls are his bride to be May Welland and Countess Olenska who would change his whole worldThe real loneliness is living among all these kind people who only ask one to pretendArcher is a perfect product of Old New York a member of one of the most prominent historic families he lives in the obligatory sumptuous brownstone on Fifth Avenue with his mild mannered mother and spinster sister and languidly pursues the law as most gentlemen of his age and inherited wealth do He is engaged to the young beautiful and eually impeccably bred May Welland who is sweet sweet natured but naive After twelve years away returns the Countess Ellen Olenska May’s cousin who through no fault of her own upsets the balance of Newland's life She is beautiful vivacious and intelligent whose long period of living in liberal European surroundings has made her innocent of the nonsensical unspoken rules of the society she has reentered and incapable of maintaining the shallow facade of her female relatives Newland feels a life of uiet misery lies ahead and despairs over Olenska as they grow closer and closer because he is forced by his own realisation to know how Ellen will be treated if she dares to divorce her husband and advises against it even though he is devoured by love for her Wharton mesmerizes with the sheer depth of emotion pain and frustration bearing down on Newland's shoulders he really is stuck between a rock and a hard place Through thwarted dreams despairing disillusionment unbearable regrets and the innocence that seals the mind against imagination and the heart against experience Newland and Ellen share a secret love that enables each of them to be the best people they can be fulfilled intellectually emotionally and socially and the fact they can never be together in harmony is just as unbearable for the reader as it is for the characters and this is where Wharton excels with people you truly believe in For May she is neither clever nor truthful and only rarely shows a spirit that reveals a depth of feeling in the face of connvention and social expectations In telling the story of how Archer and Olenska against all the strictures and taboos of their society fall in love Wharton seems to be siding with the individual in this universal tug of war But I don’t think it’s ever that simple Certainly New York's upper society in the 1870s was one of grandeur but it is described in Archer’s thoughts and Wharton’s observations as a prison of the mind one where the cells are sprinkled with gold dustThe finale of many years later moved me immensely I thought of all that went before a story that in terms of characterisation was searing on every page with the intensity of this doomed love affair A stunning novel impeccab